March 20, 2017

Southwest Book Club: Meet and Greet with Author Kristin Harmel March 28

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Join the Southwest Book Club for a meet and greet with author Kristin Harmel to discuss her novels including her latest novel, When We Meet Again.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. No registration needed. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Kristin is an international bestselling novelist whose books have been translated into numerous languages and are sold all over the world. She lives in Orlando, Florida with her husband and son. Kristin is the featured author at the Annual Southwest Author Series on Friday, April 7, 2017 at Southwest Branch Library. To learn more, visit Kristin's website.

Southwest Branch Library
Tuesday, March 28
7:00 p.m.

***If you are unable to attend the meeting and you would like to ask our guest author Kristin Harmel a question, please share it on this blog by simply clicking "Comments" located at the bottom of this post no later than 7:00 p.m. (EST) Tuesday, March 28 Join the discussion!

February 23, 2017

Southwest Book Club Meets February 28

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss this month's selection, The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant. Recounting the story of her life to her granddaughter, octogenarian Addie describes how she was raised in early-twentieth-century America by suspicious Jewish immigrant parents in a teeming multicultural neighborhood. Written with the same attention to historical detail and emotional resonance that made Diamant's previous novels bestsellers (The Red Tent and Day After Night).

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. No registration needed. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Southwest Branch Library
Tuesday, February 28
7:00 p.m.

If you are unable to attend the meeting and you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Early on it is clear Addie has a rebellious streak, joining the library group and running away to Rockport Lodge. Is Addie right to disobey her parents? Where does she get her courage?

2. Diamant fills her narrative with a number of historical events and figures, from the psychological effects of World War I and the pandemic outbreak of influenza in 1918 to child labor laws to the cultural impact of Betty Friedan. How do real-life people and events affect how we read Addie's fictional story?

3. Addie notices that the Rockport locals seem related to one another, and the cook Mrs. Morse confides in her sister that, although she is usually suspicious of immigrant boarders, "some of them are nicer than Americans" (page 167). How does tolerance of the immigrant population vary between city and town in the novel? For whom might Mrs. Morse reserve the term "Americans"?

4. The last meaningful conversation between Addie and her mother turns out to be an apology her mother meant for Celia, and for a moment during her mother's funeral Addie thinks, "She won't be able to make me feel like there's something wrong with me anymore" (page 276). Does Addie find any closure from her mother's death?

Discussion questions obtained at litlovers.com