May 16, 2017

Southwest Book Club Meets May 23


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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss this month's selection, Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett. Margaret faces a choice when her fiancé is hospitalized for depression: carry on with their plans, or back away from the suffering it may bring her. She decides to marry him. This novel is an unforgettable story of what unfolds from this act of love and faith. A story of a family facing the ultimate question: how far will we go for those we love the most?

One of the year's best books: Barnes & Noble, BookPage, BuzzFeed, Elle, Financial Times, Huffington Post, Kirkus, NPR, Refinery29, Seattle Times, Shelf Awareness, WBUR's On Point, and LA Times Book of the Year. Longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award and the Andrew Carnegie Medial for Excellence in Fiction.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. No registration needed. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.


Southwest Branch Library
Tuesday, May 23
7:00 p.m.

If you are unable to attend the meeting and you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. In attempting to explain the nature of depression to Margaret, the doctor tells her: "You could say the mind closes down. It goes into a sort of hibernation." Before reading Imagine Me Gone, what was your understanding of depression? Having read Haslett's book, have your views been altered...or confirmed?

2. What does this book suggest about our responsibility to care for one another, despite constant and expected disappointment? Is there a point in which utter hopelessness gives us permission to no longer attempt active care?

3. Had you been Margaret--or even yourself--would you have made the same choice to marry John?

Discussion questions obtained from litlovers.com

May 6, 2017

Southwest Library Featured Artist - David S. Froelich

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The Southwest Library is pleased to present David S. Froelich and his fine art photographs from around the world. This remarkable exhibit can be seen throughout the library and is on display through June 30.

Dave's photography has been featured in the Japanese magazine Kansai Scene as well as in various magazines throughout Florida. He has also published two books on his Japanese photography, Kyoto and Kinki Heels. All of Dave's work is printed by him on an Epson 4900, using high-gloss paper and dry mounted to an archival board.

Come meet Dave at a Meet the Artist event on Tuesday, June 6 at 7:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, visit www.signaturephotographs.com.

April 20, 2017

Southwest Book Club Meets April 25

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss this month's selection, A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold. For the first time, Klebold recounts the days and months leading up to the tragic shooting at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999. Her candid and unflinching narrative was largely written to explore how she and others close to her son, Dylan missed potential signs and to share insights into how other families might recognize warning signs.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. No registration needed. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Southwest Branch Library
Tuesday, April 25
7:00 p.m.

If you are unable to attend the meeting and you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. How does this book come across to you? What does Sue Klebold say her motivation was in writing A Mother's Reckoning? Does she fulfill her goal?

2. "A mother is supposed to know," Klebold has said. To what extent is she right? How much are parents supposed to know? How much can they be expected to know? If children are aware that their parents routinely search their rooms, won't they simply find better hiding places?

3. Talk about the trajectory of Dylan Klebold from Sue's "sunshine boy" to troubled, deadly killer. Was there any point when the Klebolds might have stepped in, where they might have--or should have--recognized something was amiss with Dylan, something seriously amiss?

4. How much sympathy do you accord to Sue and Tom Klebold? Has your attitude toward them changed after reading this book? Were any myths about the Klebolds dispelled, or misunderstandings clarified?

5. Should A Mother's Reckoning have been written? Should it have come out before this time? Or never at all?

Discussion questions obtained at litlovers.