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May 23, 2009

Southwest Book Club Meets June 2

awaybyamybloom.jpgThe Southwest Book Club will meet on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at the Southwest Library. The club will discuss the book Away by Amy Bloom. Arriving in America alone after her family is destroyed in a Russian pogrom, Lillian Leyb receives word that her daughter Sophie might still be alive and embarks on a risky odyssey to find the missing girl. Bloom writes with extraordinary care about people caught in emotional and physical crosswinds. Voted "Best of 2007" on many book award lists.

Copies of this book may be reserved for home delivery or location pick-up at http://www.ocls.info

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Much of the novel centers around self-invention and reinvention. Can you identify some characters who invent themselves over the course of the novel? Which characters are successful? Which characters are unable to complete the process?

2. During Lillian's journey, there are key points at which she is required to demonstrate her allegiance as either a native or a foreigner, insider or outsider. Can you identify some of these moments? At the end of the novel, how complete is Lillian's assimilation?

3. How are sexuality and physical love portrayed in the novel? Consider Lillian's relationship with the Bursteins, Chinky's relationship with Mrs. Mortimer, and Gumdrop's relationship with Snooky Salt, as well as Lillian's relationship with John Bishop and Chinky's relationship with Cleveland Munson.

4. The omniscient third-person narrator of the novel is able to jump forward and backward in time and between parallel narratives. What is the purpose of this technique? Why does the author want us to know what happened to Sophie, even though Lillian herself never learns? Do you think Lillian ever stopped looking for Sophie?

5. What significance do the chapter titles have? What are they derived from, and what do they tell the reader about what happens in the novel? Why did Bloom title her novel Away?

Discussion questions obtained at http://litlovers.com/guide_away.html


Origami Adventures for Children May 30

papercraneorigami.jpgTake an adventure with us as we learn about the culture and art of Japan. We'll kick off this hour of fun by telling the story of the paper crane. Following the story, each child will have the opportunity to delve into the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. Recommended for ages 5-12.

This program is presented by Adventure Clubhouse, Inc. To learn more about Adventure Clubhouse and their summer programs, go to http://www.adventureclubhouse.com/

For more information about this library program, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Saturday, May 30
10:30 A.M.
Southwest Library

May 18, 2009

Planning Ahead Program May 19

sunset.jpgFor most people, a loved one's death is one of the most painful experiences they will go through. Planning ahead can make this time less difficult for the famiy members left behind. Steve Harding from Woodlawn Cemetery & Funeral Home will explain the importance of planning ahead to relieve the burden for loved ones at the death of a family member or loved one.

For more information, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info
Tuesday, May 19
6 p.m.
Southwest Branch Library


May 16, 2009

May is National Women's Health Month

Blog Image.JPG May is National Women's Health Month so be sure to stop by the Southwest Library and look at the different materials we have on display. To find further information also visit these websites: Medline Plus-Women's Health and Women's Health-The Federal Government Source for Women's Health Information

May 9, 2009

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs for Allergies, Asthma and Sinus Congestion

chinese herbs.jpg Do you suffer from allergies, asthma or sinus congestion? Learn how acupuncture and Chinese herbs may help improve your breathing and clear the sinuses from Dr. Michelle O'Shaughnessy, Doctor of Oriental Medicine at the Aesthetic Acupuncture Clinic in Orlando. Sample a taste of the Breathe Easy soup from Healing Herbal Soups.



Tuesday, May 12
7:00 p.m.
Southwest Branch
407.835.7323
southwest@ocls.info
Reservations Required

Bubbalou's Bodacious Bar-B-Que May 11

barbeque.jpgGet ready for the summer barbecue season with Bubbalou's Bodacious Bar-B-Que. Learn secrets to making great barbecue and taste some succulent samples.

For more information, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info



Monday, May 11
6:00 p.m.
Southwest Library

May 4, 2009

Southwest Book Club Meets May 5

zookeeperswife.jpgThe Southwest Book Club will meet on Tuesday, May 5, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at the Southwest Library. The club will discuss the nonfiction book The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story by Diane Ackerman. The book documents the true story of Warsaw Zoo keepers and resistance activists Jan and Antonina Zabinski, who in the aftermath of Germany's invasion of Poland saved the lives of hundreds of Jewish citizens by smuggling them into empty cages and their home villa.

Copies of this book may be reserved for home delivery or location pick-up at http://www.ocls.info

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. How does Diane Ackerman's background as a naturalist and a poet inform her telling of this slice of history? Would a historian of World War II have told it differently, and, if so, what might have been left out?

2. How would you describe Antonina's relation to animals? To her husband? How does she navigate the various relationships in the book, given the extreme circumstances? Is her default position one of trust or distrust?

3. The drive to "rewrite the genetic code of the entire planet" is not distinct to Nazism. What similar efforts are alive today? Are there lessons in Jan and Antonina's story for evaluating the benefits and dangers of trying to modify or improve upon nature? Do you see any connection between this story of more than sixty years ago and contemporary environmental issues?

Discussion questions taken from http://litlovers.com/guide_zookeeper's_wife.html