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August 31, 2009

Southwest Book Club Meets September 8

girlsfromames.jpgThe Southwest Book Club will meet on Tuesday, September 8, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at the Southwest Library in the Meeting Room. The club will discuss the book, The Girls from Ames by Jeffrey Zaslow. This NYT's bestseller is the story of eleven childhood friends who formed a special bond growing up in Ames, Iowa. As young women, they moved to eight different states, yet managed to maintain an enduring friendship that would carry them through college and careers, marriage and motherhood, dating and divorce, a child's illness and the mysterious death of one member of their group. A moving tribute to female friendships.

And be sure to attend Jeffrey Zaslow's appearance at the Orlando Public Library on September 11 at 7:00 p.m. for the annual An Evening with the Author fundraiser. Don't miss this coauthor of the million-copy bestseller, The Last Lecture written with Randy Pausch. For more information, go to www.ocls.info or call 407.835.7481.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Copies of this book may be reserved for home delivery or location pick-up at http://www.ocls.info

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. At the end of his introduction, the author repeats a question posted to him: "Could a man ever really understand women's friendships?" How would you answer that question? Do you think Zaslow succeeded in his attempt to portray and explain the Ames girls' long-lasting bonds?

2. Cathy tries to explain the attachment between the women as one borne out of shared roots: "We root each other to the core of who we are, rather than what defines us as adults -by careers or spouses or kids. There's a young girl in each of us who is still full of life," (page 96). Do you think it is common for people who were close childhood friends to maintain that bond in adulthood?

3. "Male relationships are often born on the athletic fields," (page 54). What do you believe comprises male friendships? Do they form through activities like sorts or through something different? Do you know men who are part of a group much like the Ames girls? If so, how does the male group differ from the female?

4. Do you believe the closeness the girls experienced in childhood was in part a result of growing up in a small town like Ames, Iowa? Would they have been as tight a group of friends if they came of age in a big city, like New York, Chicago, or Los Angeles? How much of a factor was Ames in the women's relationships?

5. Do you agree women stay closer to friends than men do? Why or why not?

6. Do you have a collection of friends similar to the Ames girls? Who is in your circle? What does this group and its bonds mean to you?

Discussion questions obtained and adapted from http://us.penguingroup.com/static/rguides/us/girls_from_ames.html

August 12, 2009

Patent Your Great Invention August 22

light bulb.gifMeet the intellectual property experts from Beusse, Wolter, Sanks, Mora & Maire, P.A to find out how you can patent your great invention. For more information call 407.835.7323.



Saturday, August 22
2:00 p.m.
Southwest Library

Five-Star Decor on a Shoestring Budget August 18

ikealogo.jpgOn a shoestring budget? You don't have to be part of the jet set to live well. Get fresh, budget friendly ideas for infusing your personal style and a dash of order into your home from IKEA Orlando's gurus of affordable home furnishing. Free giveaways for everyone from IKEA.

For more information call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info




Tuesday, August 18
6:00 p.m.
Southwest Library

August 5, 2009

Experience the Library! Making the Most of Your Library Card August 10

OCLS.jpgAre you a new cardholder? Has it been awhile since you last visited the library? Not sure about what the library offers beyond books? This class is for you! Come learn how to make the most of your library card. Experience the Library like never before! Recommended for ages 13 and up. For more information, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info Monday, August 10 at 10:30 a.m. at the Southwest Branch.

August 4, 2009

Southwest Book Club Meets August 11

thirteenthtale.jpgThe Southwest Book Club will meet on Tuesday, August 11, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at the Southwest Library in the Meeting Room. The club will discuss the book, The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield. Margaret Lea is summoned to the home of Vida Winter, England's most popular novelist, and commanded to write her biography. Miss Winter has been falsifying her life story and her identity for more than 60 years. Facing imminent death and feeling an unexplainable connection to Margaret, Miss Winter begins to spin a haunting, suspenseful tale. Setterfield's debut novel. A ghostly tale about the tranformative power of truth.


Copies of this book may be reserved for home delivery or location pick-up at http://www.ocls.info

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Much of the novel takes place in two grand estates - Angelfield and then Miss Winter's. How are the houses reflections of their inhabitants?

2. As the story unfolds, we learn that Margaret and Miss Winter are both twins. What else do they have in common?

3. The title of this novel is taken from the title of Miss Winter's first book, Thirteen Tales of Change and Desperation, a collection of twelve stories with a mysterious thirteenth left out at the last minute before publication. How is this symbolic of the novel? What is the thirteenth tale?

4. Miss Winter frequently changes points of view from third to first person, from "they" to "we" to "I," in telling her story. The first time she uses "I" is in the recounting of Isabelle's death and Charlie's disappearance. What did you make of this shifting when Margaret points it out on page 204?

5. The story shifts significantly after the death of Mrs Dunne and John Digence. Adeline steps forward as intelligent, well-spoken, and confident -- the "girl in the mists" emerges. Did you believe this transformation? If not, what did you suspect was really going on?
(Discussion questions obtained from http://www.litlovers.com/guide_thirteentale.html)