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December 10, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets December 18


Join the Southwest Book Club this month at their annual Love of Reading celebration. No selection to read this month. Instead, celebrate your joy of reading with others by sharing one of your favorite books. Relax, enjoy refreshments, and door prizes too!

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library. For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

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Image was obtained at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Le_Cannet_Madame_Lebasque_Reading_in_the_Garden_by_Henri_Lebasque.jpeg

December 6, 2012

December Art Exhibit at the Southwest Library

The Southwest Library is proud to unveil its December art exhibit, The Light Fantastic. This unique exhibit features the breathtaking photography of JJ Dennis along with the stunning origami/kirigami creations of Al Aki. The Light Fantastic is located in the lobby display and will run through the end of December.

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JJ Dennis is a local freelance writer and photographer, specializing in digital photography/manipulation and iphone/ipadography. The photos in The Light Fantastic were taken with a Nikon D70 digital camera using an 18mm-70mm lens and an iPhone 4 using the Camera+ app.

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Al Aki is a local origami artist/expert as well as an actor and voiceover artist. Al is also a Japanese storyteller at Walt Disney World. The pieces in The Light Fantastic are a combination of origami (the ancient art of paper folding) and kirigami (a variation of origami that includes paper folding and cutting to create beautiful designs).

If you are interested in finding out more information about the art or the artists, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest at ocls dot info. JJ Dennis accepts emails at jjdennis13 at gmail dot com or through www.spiritink.blogspot.com. Al Aki may be contacted at akial2003 at yahoo dot com or through www.origamiland.com.


November 12, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets November 20

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss the book, The Confession by John Grisham on Tuesday, November 20 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. This psychological thriller by best-selling author Grisham is the story of an innocent man about to be executed and the guilty one who only can save him. But will the guilty one be able to convince the lawyers and judges of their error?

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest (at) ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Grisham has received criticism that his characters are one-dimensional--either all good or all bad, depending on which side of the death penalty issue they fall on. Do you agree? Or do you feel his characters are fully drawn? What about Keith Schroeder?

2. Grisham has also been criticized for straying from his signature suspense fiction to push his views on the death penalty. Do you agree with those critics? Should Grisham, as a writer of fiction, stay away from hot button political issues? Or should he to use his popularity as a fiction writer to speak out? Does your answer to that question align with your attitude toward the death penalty?

3. How is your reading of this novel affected by the knowledge that much in the book is based on actual events, not just in Texas but in other states as well?

4. Have you learned anything new about the working of the legal system in this country? Do you see it in a different light because of Grisham's book?

5. What are your views regarding the death penalty? Has your perspective been changed by reading this book? Do you see Grisham's book as a fair--or unfair--portrayal of the legal system and death penalty issue?
Discussion questions obtained from litlovers.com

November 9, 2012

JJ Dennis Photography Exhibit at the Southwest Library

photo.JPGJJ Dennis's photography exhibit, Haunted, is featured in the lobby display through the end of November. The photos in this exhibit were taken with a Nikon D70 digital camera using an 18mm-70mm lens and an iPhone 4 using the Camera+ app. One picture was even taken with a homemade soapbox camera.

If you are interested in finding out more information about the art or the artist, please contact JJ Dennis at jjdennis13 at gmail dot com.

The Southwest Orange Art Group Exhibit at the Southwest Library

The Southwest Orange Art Group's exhibit, The Joy of Creativity, will be displayed through the end of December. The members are local artists who work in various mediums, including acrylic, gouache, oil, pastel, and watercolor. Information about the artists contributing to this exhibit can be found in the circular display at the back of the library.
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If you are interested in finding out more about the art or joining the Southwest Orange Art Group's, please contact their founder and facilitator Debby Schmaltz at DebSchmaltz@gmail.com

October 10, 2012

Local Author Greg Dawson visits Southwest Book Club October 16

dawson_greg_.jpg Greg Dawson, local author (Hiding in the Spotlight, 2009) will visit the Southwest Book Club to discuss his latest book, Judgment Before Nuremberg on Tuesday, October 16, 7:00 p.m. at the Southwest Branch Library. Mr. Dawson's latest book is the result of his trips to Ukraine, the scene of the crime and the discovery of the trial which began the tortuous process of avenging the murder of his grandparents, great-grandparents, and 16,000 other Jews from Kharkov, Ukraine. In this book, Greg Dawson reveals a lost chapter in Holocaust history. Book sale and signing will follow the discussion.

Greg Dawson has worked as a journalist for 45 years. He is currently a business reporter and columnist at the Orlando Sentinel newspaper in Orlando, Florida.

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The Southwest Book Club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest (at) ocls.info.

Post Questions for Greg Dawson
If you are unable to attend this meeting with Greg Dawson, but have questions you would like to ask him regarding Hiding in the Spotlight and Judgment Before Nuremberg, please post it here. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Your question will be given to Mr. Dawson and his response placed within this post.

September 19, 2012

Lymphatic Yoga with Edely Wallace September 25

edely_wallace2.jpg The Lymphatic System holds the key to sound health, clear mind and spiritual awareness. To keep this system flowing properly, Edely combines her vast knowledge of Yoga with the recent scientific discoveries about the Lymphatic System in a single effective method to help people restore and reach optimal health - Lymphatic Yoga. Join Edely to hear her discuss this exciting new approach and watch her demonstrate the practice of Lymphatic Yoga.

Edely Wallace, Master Yoga Instructor and Director of Yogamatrix Studio in Orlando has 26 years of Yoga teaching experience. She is certified as a Lymph Therapist by Foldi College and Clinic in Hinterzarten, Germany (2011) and Vodder School in Walchsee, Austria (2012). Edely has been researching the Lymphatic System for over 20 years. She is the author of three books about Yoga and the Lymphatic System. A book sale and signing will follow the program.
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Tuesday
September 25
6:30 p.m.
Southwest Branch Library

For more program information, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest(at)ocls.info

Meet the Artist at Southwest September 22

Meet artist, graphic designer, and photographer Vesternel Coleman and custom framer and sculptor Leo Coleman (sister and brother) and view their exhibits at the Southwest Library.

Saturday
September 22
2:00 p.m.

For more event information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest(at)ocls.info

Enjoy art and light refreshments.

Exhibit Information
On the Wings of Imagination
Vesternel Coleman, an artist, graphic designer, and photographer has on display her works of abstract paintings and photography. Her paintings reveal the beauty of the imagination through the use of vivid colors; her photography reveals the beauty of the imagination through the use of nature. Ms Coleman has exhibited her art at different galleries throughout the Orlando area since 2005. In December 2011, she won a second place award at the Orange County Annual Juried Exhibition of the National Arts Program in Orlando.

The History Collection
Leo Coleman, a custom framer and sculptor has on display his framed collection commemorating historic events and individuals. Leo is known worldwide for his exquisite art collection and unique sculptures. Mr. Coleman is the owner of the Community Art Gallery in Orlando.


To contact the artists:
Vesternel: call 407.399.7378
Leo: call 321.945.5720 (office) or 407.616.2662 (mobile); email leocoleman153(at)yahoo.com

September 14, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets September 18

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss the book, Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese on Tuesday, September 18 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. Twin brothers born from a secret love affair between an Indian nun and a British surgeon, come of age in an Ethiopia on the brink of revolution, where their love for the same woman drives them apart. An enthralling family saga of Africa and America, doctors and patients, exile and home.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest (at) ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. A passionate, unique love affair sets Cutting for Stone in motion, and yet this romance remains a mystery--even to the key players--until the very conclusion of the novel. How does the relationship between Sister Mary Joseph Praise and Thomas Stone affect the lives of Shiva and Marion, Hema and Ghosh, Matron and everyone else at Missing? What do you think Verghese is trying to say about the nature of love and loss?

2. Almost all of the characters in Cutting for Stone are living in some sort of exile, self-imposed or forced, from their home country--Hema and Ghosh from India, Marion from Ethiopia, Thomas from India and then Ethiopia. Verghese is of Indian descent but was born and raised in Ethiopia, went to medical school in India, and has lived and worked in the United States for many years. What do you think this novel says about exile and the immigrant experience? How does exile change these characters, and what do they find themselves missing the most about home?

3. Abraham Verghese has said that his ambition in writing Cutting for Stone was to "tell a great story, an old-fashioned, truth-telling story." In what ways is Cutting for Stone an old-fashioned story-and what does it share with the great novels of the nineteenth century? What essential human truths does it convey?


4. Although it's also a play on the surname of the characters, the title Cutting for Stone comes from a line in the Hippocratic Oath: "I will not cut for stone, even for patients in whom the disease is manifest; I will leave this operation to be performed by practitioners, specialists in this art." Verghese has said that this line comes from ancient times, when bladder stones were epidemic and painful: "There were itinerant stone cutters--lithologists--who could cut into either the bladder or the perineum and get the stone out, but because they cleaned the knife by wiping their blood-stiffened surgical aprons, patients usually died of infection the next day." How does this line resonate for the doctors in the novel?

5. In what important ways does Marion come to resemble his father, although he grows up without him? How does Marion grow and change over the course of the novel?

Discussion questions obtained at Litlovers.com

August 13, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets August 21

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss the book, Unbroken: A World War ll Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand on Tuesday, August 21 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. Hillenbrand, bestselling author of Seabiscuit tells the gripping true story of a U.S. airman who survived when his bomber crashed into the sea during World War II, spent forty-seven days adrift in the ocean before being rescued by the Japanese Navy, and was held as a prisoner until the end of the war.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest (at) ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Laura Hillenbrand gives us a moving story, one that brings to life the suffering and courage of not just one man but thousands, whose stories are untold. What is it about Hillenbrand's writing that saves her book from becoming mired in bathos and melodrama?

2. What do you admire most about Zamperini? What enables him to survive the plane crash and POW ordeal? Does he possess special strengths--personal or physical? Did his training in track, for instance, make a difference in his resilience?

3. Why, after World War II, did the medical profession fail to acknowledge Post Traumatic Stress Disorder? After all, this was the mid-20th century, and psychiatry was a fairly established discipline. Plus, the horrors of World War I were only one generation behind. What took so long?

4. Unbroken is a classic inspirational story, but it lies somewhat on the surface, offering little in the way of psychological depth. Do you wish there were more introspection in Zamperini's account? Or do you feel this story is rich enough as it is?

5. Readers and critics alike have described Unbroken as gripping, almost impossible to put down. Was that your experience as well? How do you account for the page-turning quality given the grim subject material? Also, would your reading experience have been different if you didn't know that Zamperini survived? (Or didn't you know the outcome?)

Discussion questions obtained at http://www.litlovers.com


July 25, 2012

Art Exhibits at Southwest through September 2012

Sister and brother, Vesternel Coleman and Leo Coleman are displaying exhibits at the Southwest Library through September.

On the Wings of Imagination
Vesternel Coleman, an artist, graphic designer, and photographer has on display her works of abstract paintings and photography. Her paintings reveal the beauty of the imagination through the use of vivid colors; her photography reveals the beauty of the imagination through the use of nature. Ms Coleman has exhibited her art at different galleries throughout the Orlando area since 2005. In December 2011, she won a second place award at the Orange County Annual Juried Exhibition of the National Arts Program in Orlando.

The History Collection
Leo Coleman, a custom framer and sculptor has on display his framed collection commemorating historic events and individuals. Leo is known worldwide for his exquisite art collection and unique sculptures. Mr. Coleman is the owner of the Community Art Gallery in Orlando.

For more exhibit information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest(at)ocls.info
To contact the artists:
Vesternel: call 407.399.7378
Leo: call 321.945.5720 (office) or 407.616.2662 (mobile); email leocoleman153(at)yahoo.com

July 10, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets July 17

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Join the Southwest Book Club to discuss the book, Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks on Tuesday, July 17 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. Once again, Brooks takes a remarkable shard of history and brings it to vivid life. In 1665, a young man from Martha's Vineyard became the first Native American to graduate from Harvard College. Upon this slender factual scaffold, Brooks has created a luminous tale of love and faith, magic and adventure.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. How are the lifestyles of the Wampanoag and the English settlers different?

2. In discussing the purchase of the island from the Wampanoag, Bethia's father says, "some now say that [the sonquem] did not fully understand that we meant to keep the land from them forever. Be that as it may, what's done is done and it was done lawfully" (p. 9). Do you agree with his opinion?

3. Examine Caleb's view of the settlers on p. 143 - 144. Why does he say that the sound of their "boots, boots, and more boots" (p. 143) moved him to cross cultures and adopt Christianity? Contrast this with Tequamuck's reaction to the settlers' arrival (p. 295). Placed in their situation, what would you have felt?

4. Compared with those in her community, Bethia is remarkably unprejudiced in her view of the Wampanoag. Did you grow up surrounded by prejudices you disagreed with? How did this affect you? Conversely, did you have prejudices in your youth that you've since overcome?

5. Bethia sees her mother's silence as a great strength and tool in dealing with society, particularly as a woman in a male-dominated culture. However, while Bethia repeatedly tries to emulate this behavior, she's often overcome by her own passionate opinions. Find an example where Bethia's boldness in stating her mind is a good thing, and an example where it brings her trouble. Have you ever wished you had spoken when instead you stayed quiet--or wished you had stayed quiet instead of having spoken your mind?

6. Both Bethia and Caleb struggle against the limits and expectations placed on them by society. How are their experiences similar? How are they different? Who faces the greater challenge?

Note: All page references relate to the print copy of the book. Discussion questions were obtained from Novelist Plus database and litlovers.com


June 14, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets June 19

children_fire.jpg Join the Southwest Book Club this month to discuss the book, Children and Fire by Ursula Hegi on Tuesday, June 19 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. Protecting her beloved students from the devastating world outside of their 1934 Berlin classroom, Thekla Jansen, a gifted young teacher sacrifices some of her personal freedoms to retain her teaching position until activities within Hitler's early regime test her moral courage.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Children and Fire takes place over the course of one day, with flashbacks interspersed throughout. How does the novel's structure influence your understanding of the events in the book? How does Thekla's past inform her response to the events of February 27, 1934?

2. Being a good teacher is incredibly important to Thekla. What do you think makes a teacher effective? Do you think teachers have responsibilities to their students beyond the curriculum? Can you explain what they are? Do you believe Thekla is a good teacher?

3. On page 97, the author writes, "Messages change. Right and wrong can trade places, fall out of fashion." How do you interpret this? Can you think of an incident when you were forced to reexamine your perceptions of right and wrong? What is the impact of propaganda on society--past and present?

4. When the students pick on Eckart, one of the weaker students in the Thekla's class, she thinks, "if you step back, you are lost. The urge of the pack will escalate." (p. 191) How is Thekla's classroom a microcosm of the attitudes in Germany and in the world at large? What is the allure of losing yourself to "crowd mentality"? What is the danger?

5. Why do you think the Hitler Youth is so alluring to the boys in Thekla's class? Can you empathize with them? Do you believe they are aware of the moral implications of participating?
Discussion questions obtained at:
http://books.simonandschuster.com/Children-and-Fire/Ursula-Hegi/9781451608298/reading_group_guide

May 21, 2012

Evoke365 Exhibit at Southwest through June 2012

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Evoke365 is one of many projects by Evoke Ministries, an Orlando-based 501 c3 non-profit ministry dedicated to sharing the Gospel through creative mediums. The Evoke365 Project officially started July 1, 2010 with a group of 10 artists of various skill levels, committed to create one painting, every day for one year. The purpose of the project is to produce works of art in order to engage the community in discussions of faith and also strengthen artists within the Christian community to be bold in their creativity and confession of faith.

The Evoke365 Project artwork and paintings are on display at the Southwest Library through June. For more information regarding this exhibit, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

To learn more about the Evoke365 Project and Evoke Ministries, go to www.EVOKE365.com

May 9, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets May 15

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Join the Southwest Book Club this month to discuss the award-winning book, Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson on Tuesday, May 15 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. A 1954 murder trial in an island community off the coast of Washington state broadens into an exploration of war, race, and the mysteries of human motivation. Guterson has written a thoughtful, poetic novel, a cleverly constructed courtroom drama with detailed, compelling characters.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Snow Falling on Cedars opens in the middle of Kabuo Miyamoto's trial. It will be pages before we learn the crime of which he has been accused or the nature of the evidence against him. What effect does the author create by withholding this information and introducing it in the form of flashbacks? Where else in the narrative are critical revelations postponed? How is this novel's past related to its fictional present?

2. The trial functions both as this novel's narrative frame and as its governing metaphor. As we follow it, we are compelled to ask larger questions about the nature of truth, guilt, and responsibility. How does the author interweave these two functions? Which characters are aware that what is at stake is more than one man's guilt?

3. Racism is a persistent theme in this novel. It is responsible for the internment of Kabuo, Hatsue, and their families, for Kabuo's loss of his land, and perhaps for his indictment for murder. In what ways do the book's Japanese characters respond to the hostility of their white neighbors? How does bigotry manifest itself in the thoughts and behavior of characters like Etta Heine--whose racism is keenly ironic in view of her German origins--Art Moran, and Ishmael himself? Are we meant to see these characters as typical of their place and time?

4. One way that Guterson interweaves his novel's multiple narrative strands is through the use of parallelism: Ishmael spies on Hatsue; so does Kabuo. The two men are similarly haunted by memories of the war. Both Kabuo and Carl Heine turn out to be dissatisfied fishermen who yearn to return to farming. Where else in this novel does the author employ this method, and to what effect?

5. Ishmael's attraction to Hatsue is closely connected to a yearning for transcendence, as indicated by their early conversation about the ocean. Ishmael says, "It goes forever, " while Hatsue insists, "It ends somewhere" [p. 97]. Typically, it is Ishmael who wishes to dissolve boundaries, Hatsue who keeps reasserting them, as when she gently withholds the embrace that Ishmael so desperately wants. What limits might Ishmael wish to transcend, even as a boy? Does he ever manage to do so? Does Snow Falling on Cedars hold the promise of transcendence for its characters or at best offer them a reconciliation with their limits?

Questions obtained from Litlovers.

April 11, 2012

7th Annual Southwest Author Series Featuring Tim Dorsey April 20

Join us at the 7th Annual Southwest Author Series event featuring Florida author Tim Dorsey. Famous for his crime capers featuring Serge Storm, Mr. Dorsey will share about his experiences as a writer in Florida. Refreshments will be served at 6 p.m. Special thanks to the generous support of Publix and Hospitality Staff. Stay after the program for a book sale and signing with Tim Dorsey. This program is in partnership with The Rotary Club of Dr. Phillips.

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Friday, April 20
6:30 p.m.
Southwest Branch Library

Southwest Book Club Meets April 17

31BondStreet.jpg Join the Southwest Book Club this month to discuss 31 Bond Street by Ellen Horan on Tuesday, April 17at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. In a story based on an actual killing, Dr. Harvey Burdell, a prominent New York City dentist, is found stabbed and decapitated in his townhouse. Police promptly arrest the widow who managed his house and servants, but attorney Henry Clinton swiftly comes to her defense, and is pitted against an ambitious district attorney. Scandal, social climbing, and corruption in Manhattan during the 1850s come alive in Horan's historical mystery.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. 31 Bond Street is a unique novel because it has two leads and the plot is told from both points of view: Henry Clinton, who is the defense lawyer in the murder case and Emma Cunningham, the defendant. The scenes go back and forth from the present with flashbacks. How does this create tension? Does the reader benefit from each point of view? Do you find that you were more involved with one part of the story than the other?

2. What rights didn't Emma Cunningham have that women have today? Was she a typical product of her class and education? Is she a sympathetic character? Is her motivation to secure a future for her daughters valid? What would happen if she didn't find a husband? Could she support herself? What would be her fate? Was she motivated by survival or greed when she tries to make property deals and enter into the male world of financial negotiation? Is she motivated by survival or greed to find marriages for her daughters? How much is her quest a search for love, and how much a quest for survival? How are her daughter's characters shaped by her decisions? Are women caught in some of the same binds today, or have these dilemmas been entirely eliminated?

3. The role of the Newspapers and communication at this time in our history: Newspapers were king in this time period in NYC. How did the accounts in the newspapers play a role in the events? How were real clippings used inside the story? Do they enhance the story? Even though the technologies have changed in spreading news, are there similar patterns today in breaking stories? Is it possible for any news source to be 100% objective? Is it possible to know if what is reported is truth, rumor or slander? Is there more or less reliable information with the advent of the internet than in the past when there were many vital city newspapers?

4. What is fiction and what is fact in 31 Bond Street? Much of the novel is based on actual documents and true events in this case. Which characters were real and which were made up? What events in the book were embellished? Do you find that using real characters in a fictional novel works? Does this make you want to read more about the actual case or other aspects of the history the era? Can a fictional work give a real "sense" of the past?

Discussion questions obtained from author's site at Harper Collins http://www.harpercollins.com/author/microsite/readingguide.aspx?authorID=35472&isbn13=9780061773976&displayType=readingGuide


March 16, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets March 20

cleopatra.jpg Join the Southwest Book Club this month to discuss Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff on Tuesday, March 20 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. This Pulitzer Prize author weaves together sex and celebrity, empire and politics in a story that is as contemporary as it is ancient. Schiff's work of nonfiction fully captures the operatic power of Cleopatra's life and reign.

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Why is Cleopatra's past so mysterious?

2. Why is she such an enduring historical figure?

3. How did the asp become part of Cleopatra's legend?

4. How did prejudices of the time affect Cleopatra?

5. If you read a historical fiction title about Cleopatra, compare your reading experiences after now reading a nonfiction title.

Discussion question obtained from Novelist Plus database.

February 20, 2012

Photo Gallery - Author Joy Johnson visits Southwest Book Club

Joy Johnson, author of the mystery/comedy series The BOOB Girls (Burned Out Old Broads) visited the Southwest Book Club on January 20. Joy shared her latest installment BOOB Girls lll: Sandhills and Shadows. A book signing and sale followed the program.
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February 14, 2012

Full Time RVing Book by Connie Gleason February 15

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Connie Gleason will discuss her book, Living Your Dream: A How-To Manual for Full Time RVing.

Wednesday, February 15
2:00 p.m.
Southwest Branch Library

Have you ever dreamed of selling your house, buying an RV and traveling? Well, Connie and her husband, Ken did just that! Connie will tell you how to move from homeowner to full-time RVer, learn to drive an RV, select an RV, find campgrounds, live on the road and more. If you are about to make the RV leap or always dreamed of RVing, don't miss this program. Book sale and signing will follow the program.

For more information, call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info

Southwest Book Club Meets February 21

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The Southwest Book Club will meet on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room at the Southwest Library. We will discuss authors and their works featured at this year's Winter with the Writers annual event at Rollins College. Featured writers this year include: Carl Hiaasen, Mihaela Moscaliuc, Ilya Kaminsky, Paula McLain, and Chimamanda Adichie. Pick one or more to read!

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest(at)ocls.info.

January 9, 2012

Southwest Book Club Meets January 17

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Join the Southwest Book Club this month to discuss The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai on Tuesday, January 17 at 7:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room. In this delightful, funny, and moving first novel, a librarian and a young boy obsessed with reading take to the road when the boy runs away from his parents who force him to attend anti-gay classes with a celebrity pastor. But who is really running away?

Anyone age 18 or older is welcome to attend. The book club meets monthly at the Southwest Branch Library.

For more information, please call 407.835.7323 or email southwest@ocls.info.

Discussion Questions
If you are unable to attend the meeting or you would like to join our discussion, you can share your thoughts or respond to the discussion questions below. Simply click "Comments" located at the bottom of this post. Join the discussion!

1. Who is the "borrower" in the novel?

2. Under what circumstances is it acceptable to take a child away from his/her parents? Based on what you know about Janet Drake, is she an "unfit" parent?

3. Does one have to first become a parent or in Lucy's case, a parent proxy in order to come to terms with one's own parents?

4. In many ways, The Borrower is Lucy's coming-of-age story as much as it is about Ian. Is she, like Jim in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn freed at the end of the novel, or like Humbert in Lolita, diminished by her experiences?

5. What were the seminal books of your childhood? Are any of them mentioned in The Borrower?
(Discussion questions obtained from http://us.penquingroup.com/static/rguides/us/borrower.html)

Creating the Life You Love January 14

Life Coaches Mona El Alaoui and M.Ximena Olarte are experts in helping people achieve the best in their lives. They will facilitate a group coaching experience that will cover key elements of awareness and clarity; ways to define personal priorities leading to a balanced life; and commitment to personal priorities. The life you desire is waiting for you. Take the next step into your personal power!


Mona is a Certified International and Executive Life Coach. For more information about Mona go to: http://lifeskillsresourcegroup.com/Mona-El-Aloui/index.php
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M.Ximena is a Certified Life Coach Practitioner. To learn more about Ximena, go to www.maximenaolarte.com.
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For more information and registration, call 407.835.7323 southwest@ocls.info

Saturday
January 14
1:00 p.m.
Southwest Library

January 6, 2012

Design Your Own Aquaponics System January 7

Imagine Your Own Health Food Factory.
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Did you know you can create a sustainable garden and a fish farm at your home all-in-one? Aquaponics combines the practices of hydroponic vegetable gardening with at-home aquaculture. Shane Harris will show you can how you can set up your own aquaponics structure and start feeding your family with healthy, and locally, grown fish and vegetables. To learn more, visit
www.aquaponicbasics.blogspot.com

Saturday, January 7
11:00 a.m.
Southwest Branch

For more information about this library program, call 407.835.7323.